Tag: Short Story Flash

The Tenements Bus Stop by Chris Armstrong

She told me she loved me. She whispered it. She breathed in my ear. She brushed my lips and breathed into my mouth. We hugged and she pressed against me. I could feel her body against mine. She kissed me and I found myself responding, my lips against hers. Briefly her tongue flickered and pushed

Continue reading

Something He Said by Dan Brotzel

The day before yesterday, my son said something wonderful. It was one of those things children say that delight and charm adults, like when his sister called a church ‘an astronaut’s castle’, or when he asked a beekeeper if you can get dragonfly honey. He took some humdrum adult concept, invested it with poetry and

Continue reading

One Last Drink by Sarah McPherson

It was a family tradition, to greet each new calamity with a party. It might seem strange, but it was actually rather joyous; the absurdity of cheering and clinking glasses when something had gone terribly, terribly wrong. My earliest memory was of celebrating some failure of my father’s with canapes and champagne. So when the

Continue reading

Great Idea by Niles Reddick

“Wilford passed this morning. They said one minute he was here and the next he was gone.” “Isn’t that the way it is? We’re like water in a bathtub, moving closer to the drain and tunnel. After all, we are mostly water. “ “That is a horrible way to look at life.” “No, not at

Continue reading

The Worry by Orla Owen

A fly landed on the bottom of the saucepan that was resting on the drainer. Which was allowed. Because it was on the bottom of the saucepan, not inside it, unlike the fly that had greeted Cora when she’d opened the butter dish on Tuesday morning. It had been dead on its back, right in

Continue reading

Gills by Alpheus Williams

Zeus, the child of Titans, ate his own and begat new gods. Some believe the Gills are Science’s revenge for ignoring their warnings. Some say Science genetically engineered them so that a remnant of humanity could survive the great inundations and extremes that resulted from Climate Change.  Some say it was just a natural progression

Continue reading

Jean Coutrot’s Birthday Party 1939 by Kerry Rawlinson

I see you, Madame Coutrot, carefully arranging canapés and petit-fours. Highly sought-after, they were obtained with your husband Jean’s exclusive Polytechnic food-stamps. There’s no gateau (he considers it extravagant), but he’s baked modest cupcakes himself (chocolate, his favourite). Your hand trembles as you insert one small candle. Your body betrays you constantly – the pristine

Continue reading

An Hour Past My Bedtime by Francine Witte

Me and Shady Granger playing grownup. Me and he. Just past 12 years old. Me chugging an empty whiskey bottle and him fake-smoking a cigarette. Pretending we are like our own parents. His family came from over there. Forbidden part of town. Part of town where the poor folks live, my daddy always said, and

Continue reading

Drawing the Curtain by Michael Loveday

After departing in a blaze of mediocrity, Graham Vasey returned to St. Joseph’s Junior School only twice in his life. The first time, it was being renamed the Graham Vasey Junior School, in dedication to his Booker Prize-winning success. He had sprung from such humble origins; he thanked his schooldays, in several interviews, as a

Continue reading

Toe, Party of One by Aubrie Artiano

You’ve just walked in the door, stripped off your Lycra and turned on the shower when you see it: the toe. Not an ordinary toe; not a toe attached to a foot attached to a leg attached to a body. No. This is a severed toe. Freshly severed. It’s upright and propped against the wall.

Continue reading