Tag: short fiction review

The Dressing-Up Box by David Constantine

What you can be guaranteed with David Constantine is a fabulous story, masterfully told – and this can be said for his latest offering The Dressing-Up Box – which left me enraptured and stunned at the sheer brilliance on show. Comma Press are a publisher whom I love, they continue to churn out top quality

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The BBC National Short Story Award 2019 Anthology by Various

In the introduction to The BBC National Short Story Award 2019 broadcaster and chair of judges Nikki Bedi writes… ‘short stories are not a warm up for the ‘real thing’ as some would have us believe. They are gifts of concision, they demand one’s total attention’. As an ardent fan of short fiction – more

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Subjunctive Moods by CG Menon

A short story collection that captivates from the very start, Subjunctive Moods is a spectacular triumph and brilliant example of how setting can really bring a story to life. Menon is no stranger to multi-cultural experiences, and this shines through in her short prose. Each story is crafted to the utmost quality, and we feel

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The Things That Love Does by Amanda Saint

Fact: Falling in love activates the same part of the brain as cocaine addiction. So, you just have to accept it. I’m addicted to you. It’s out of my control. * Fact: A 2011 study found that the brain patterns of longtime, happily married couples behave in much the same way as those of couples

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The False River by Nick Holdstock

I first discovered the tremendous voice that is Nick Holdstock when I reviewed Unthology 11 (review here) and his story ‘Half‘ – which came kicking and screaming into my world. So, I was delighted to hear that he had a collection coming out from Unthank and was overjoyed when it arrived in the post for

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Lot by Bryan Washington

This book quite literally blew me away, knocked the wind out of my lungs and had me crawling amongst my tattered dreams of wanting to be a writer – because, you see, Bryan Washington is the writer I want to be. Washington delivers a beguiling collection of intimate portraits of the lost and silenced voices

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Margaret Thatcher by Meg Pokrass

The kinds of things he says about his wife. The way he describes her smile. “Actually, you know who she reminds me of the most?” ”Nope, who,” I say. “She reminds me of Margaret Thatcher, the Meryl Streep version,” he says. He laughs. I laugh. We laugh and sometimes I cry. He holds me and

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BOOK REVIEW: Jutland by Lucie McKnight Hardy

There is a time in your life when you are in exactly the right place, at exactly the right time, reading a story you were supposed to be reading. Jutland by Lucie McKnight Hardy was simply that story, at that time, in that place. The stars seemed to have aligned and well, the power of

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BOOK REVIEW: Cosmopolitan by Akhil Sharma

Akhil Sharma’s ‘Cosmopolitan’ is a story of overlaps, or perhaps, multitudes. Part of the Faber Stories series – celebrating 90 years of their publishing – ‘Cosmopolitan’ is a piece that speaks to numerous intertwined narratives. As the synopsis will tell us, ‘Gopal Maurya’s wife has left him, preferring to seek enlightenment in an ashram in

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