Tag: Science Fiction

Green Valley by Louis Greenberg

A timely novel which makes the reader question their place in our modern, technological, world, Green Valley offers a unique comment on society via the use of its fast-paced plot and bold characters. As we begin to take a look at how and why we use technology within every aspect of our lives, Green Valley

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GUEST POST: Write What You Know by David H. Reiss

Once upon a time–when dinosaurs roamed the earth and I was still in high school–I had a wonderful English teacher who treated his students as peers and insisted that we all call him by his first name; his enthusiasm for literature and drama was outright contagious. He convinced me to read outside my preferred genres

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BOOK REVIEW: Children of Ruin by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Long ago, Earth’s terraforming program sent ships out to build new homes for humanity among the stars and made an unexpected discovery: a planet with life. But the scientists were unaware that the alien ecosystem was more developed than the primitive life forms originally discovered. Now, thousands of years later, the Portiids and their humans

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VOX by Christina Dalcher

To truly capture the essence of this book, I am going to write a review of only 100 words: As relevant and terrifying as The Handmaid’s Tale, Vox is a dystopic nightmare brought to startling reality. With a focus on language and social interaction, Dalcher manages to perfectly convey a chilling atmosphere of fear, oppression, hatred and silence

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BOOK REVIEW: Ubik by Philip K Dick (The Folio Society Edition)

Philip K Dick is in my opinion and many others the master of science fiction. His works seems to drip off the tongue when one mentions said genre, such works as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, The Man in the High Castle, Time Out of Joint, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly – the list

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BOOK REVIEW: Ruin’s Wake by Patrick Edwards

‘Ruin’s Wake imagines a world ruled by a totalitarian government, where history has been erased and individual identity is replaced by the machinations of the state. As the characters try to save what they hold most dear – in one case a dying son, in the other secret love – their fates converge to a

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BOOK REVIEW: The Migration by Helen Marshall

The world is besieged by natural disasters, a disease that affects only the young is spreading, and tragedy appears at the forefront of everyone’s lives. The Migration is a wonderfully skilful novella that combines an elegiac beauty with an overarching sense of societal menace. Written from the perspective of Sophie, a sixteen-year-old girl who is

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BOOK REVIEW: The Loosening Skin by Aliya Whiteley

The Loosening Skin is so unique, and breathtakingly weird that one can’t help but stand back and be amazed. It’s a new breed of horror from a strikingly powerful emerging talent and a book that I just couldn’t get enough of – I read the whole thing in a couple of sittings, such is the

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BEST BOOKS: Ross Jeffery’s Best Books Read in 2018

Our head of books has been rather busy this year and has had a remarkable turnover of reviews. Reading everything that has come his way, from the big publishers to many a independent press and so we feel he’s the guy to talk to you about his best books of 2018 – or the year

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BOOK REVIEW: We by Yevgeny Zamyatin

What is interesting about literature written in the past is the omnipotent manner with which one, from our saggy hi-tech sofas in the future, can now read it: the time capsule quality of it. A quality so much more heightened when reading someone’s version of the future as written in the past, often wildly off

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