Tag: Salt Publishing

The Complex by Michael Walters

An unsettling novel which taps into a range of human emotions, The Complex is a surprisingly thrilling book. Analysing the darker side of technology is a popular novel theme, however The Complex doesn’t ever feel tired or repetitive; instead, it manages to hand over a great deal of trust to the reader, finishing with an

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Melting Point by Baret Magarian

‘Melting Point’ is an odd collection, to say the least. Though here, ‘odd’ isn’t to be taken as a negative, rather, what makes ‘Melting Point’ so strangely enjoyable is its oddities – it’s whispered moments of surrealism and shouted moments of the humorous absurd. Magarian is a lyrical author, who fuses and blends his prose

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The South Westerlies by Jane Fraser

Fraser’s debut, ‘The South Westerlies’, a collection of 18 short stories set mostly in and around Gower, South Wales, is rife and woven with careful detail and design. I could ramble and try to find a multitude of words to describe it, but ultimately, the collection is a joy to read for all those who

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Good Day? by Vesna Main

A piece of experimental fiction which thankfully doesn’t lose sight of itself, Good Day? is an accomplished novel that explores obsession, desire, and human interaction. Our nameless narrators, a female Writer and her opinionated reader husband, expose themselves and the cracks in their relationship while they analyse a work of fiction and lose themselves in

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The Bothy by Trevor Mark Thomas

When you think of the high-level pitch of Trevor Mark Thomas’s The Bothy – having to seek refuge in a rural Yorkshire  pub frequented by odd people with dark secrets – you could  be forgiven for conjuring up an image of the Slaughtered Lamb in An American Werewolf in London. A deeply hostile welcome, Brian

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BOOK REVIEW: Zero Hours by Neil Campbell

‘I walked in on my first shift and was met by the manager, Hakan. He was a little prick. I could see it from the start.’ So begins Zero Hours, the second in a proposed ‘Manchester Trilogy’ by realist writer Neil Campbell. We are back with our troubadour narrator, bouncing from menial job to menial

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FICTION: A Suicide Note by Vesna Main

It was a last minute booking: Mr George Smithson. Reception claimed he had called on several occasions but failed to finalise the arrangements. That was shorthand for time-wasters who rang for kicks, with no intention of proceeding. ‘The old bugger kept giving a different name,’ Myra said, ‘but I recognised the voice and checked the

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BOOK REVIEW: The Other World, It Whispers by Stephanie Victoire

It is hard to say what makes a good short story collection, assessing the quality of one story is hard enough, let alone many. A short story collection can manage to delight and disappoint at the same time; it can push the boundaries and simultaneously stay safely within them.  There are no rules on how

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FICTION: XII The Hanged Dog (Dog’s Nightmare III) by Padrika Tarrant – Exclusive to STORGY!

Round the back of the new-created Primark, suspended between concrete and sky by a scaffold-pole, between the Tarot and the truth, a dog turns slowly in the rain, hung by electric cable, suspended by one hind paw. The angels think it’s a right old wheeze. The shop is young still, and tender, held up by

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BOOK REVIEW: Death and the Seaside by Alison Moore

A woman living in a lifeless, depressing seaside town wakes one night to find a blank piece of paper has been slipped beneath the door to her room. The woman, Susan, lives above the pub where she works. Hers is an unsatisfactory, depressing existence that, we soon learn, is the creation of another woman, Bonnie

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