Tag: poetry

Lanny by Max Porter

Well I am a huge fan of Max Porter, his writing to me is always a joy to read as he has such a hold over the written word with his prose being quite poetic, with each word fighting for its right to be included in the storytelling, and the deftly constructed prose he offers

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BOOK REVIEW: Humanagerie Edited by Sarah Doyle & Allen Ashley

‘Inspired by notions of the animalistic, Humanagerie is a vivid exploration of the nebulous intersection between human and beast […] these thirty-two poems and thirteen short stories explore emergence and existence, survival and self-mythology, and the liminal hinterland between humanity and animality.’  Edited by Sarah Doyle and Allen Ashley, Humanagerie is a collection of quality –

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BOOK REVIEW: Where the Road Runs Out by Gaia Holmes

Gaia Holmes’ third collection with Manchester’s ever-reliable Comma Press is a bittersweet gem. Writing mostly in a kind of disciplined free verse, Holmes runs her eye across a wealth of strange material, exploring the private dreams of pylons, the curious properties of sinkholes and how best to react when transforming into a sea horse. Yet

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BOOK REVIEW: A Herring Famine by Adam O’Riordan

For his debut collection, In the Flesh, Adam O’Riordan demonstrated a leaning towards the past and a fluidity of form, both of which bent naturally to his rich, allusive style. As Andrew Motion writes in the blurb for this new volume, here is a poet with ‘tremendous delicacy of feeling and expression’, and so he

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BOOK REVIEW: Did You Put The Weasels Out? by Niall Bourke

Well now, here’s a curio. Billed as a ‘perverse novel in verse’, Did you put the Weasels Out? is several things at once – the tragi-comic story of an Irish emigrant’s blossoming mid-life crisis, a re-imagining of the legend of Cú Chulainn and a formal experiment which begins as a series of Onegin sonnets and

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BOOK REVIEW: Mayhem & Death by Helen McClory

The quality of the writing here announces itself from the start: Frances had waited…for the static to disperse from her daughter’s personality; the obscuring details of herself that got between her and other people and then, shortly after, a storm cloud poured into the shape of a girl. These are the kind of short stories

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BOOK REVIEW: Don’t Call Us Dead by Danez Smith

If anger is an energy, then so is love. This collection, a much-lauded finalist for the American National Book Award, comes fizzing with both. The author, Danez Smith, is a vibrant young black poet whose writing flows most often between tender, elegiac confessionals and the incantatory charge of the performance pieces for which he is

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POETRY: Hyggeligt by Manny Blacksher

Manny Blacksher Manny Blacksher grew up in Alabama, but has lived for long periods in Montreal and Dublin, Ireland. Over sixty of his poems have appeared in publications that include Poetry Ireland Review, The Guardian’s Online Poetry Workshop, Measure, and The Maynard. His short story, ‘Des Cruditees’, was published in Blue Monday Review. STORGY Magazine

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POETRY: The Bean Sidhe by Manny Blacksher

Manny Blacksher Manny Blacksher grew up in Alabama, but has lived for long periods in Montreal and Dublin, Ireland. Over sixty of his poems have appeared in publications that include Poetry Ireland Review, The Guardian’s Online Poetry Workshop, Measure, and The Maynard. His short story, ‘Des Cruditees’, was published in Blue Monday Review. STORGY Magazine

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POETRY: The Poltergeist by Manny Blacksher

We took almost a week to surmise it was martial drumming in tattoo twenty feet above their roof. We knew by month’s end other similarly apprised domestic incidents: wedding service smashed plate-by-plate, sheets ripped off beds at three am, keys whipped at heads, and faces pressed—mouths gaping, eyeless— against the window panes in empty rooms.

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