Tag: Non-Fiction

The Night I Met David Sedaris by Eva Rivers

‘Don’t write like a housewife. And read David Sedaris.’ This was the advice my daughter gave me as she thrust a copy of his book, Let’s Discuss Diabetes With Owls into my hands. Three years later, on the night of my 49th birthday, Bec took me to see David Sedaris at Cadogan Hall in London.

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BOOK REVIEW: Find Momo Across Europe by Andrew Knapp

This little book is perfect for sitting on a small coffee table. The photography is so beautiful you could just sit for an age flicking through the pages. Find Momo Across Europe is a lovely photographic journey across the Mediteranean, Europe and Britain. If anyone has visited any of these places you will recognise them

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BOOK REVIEW: Death Valley Superstars by Duke Haney

An entertaining collection of essays that is hard to put down and forget about, Duke Haney’s Death Valley Superstars isn’t just another book about Hollywood. Using his unrivalled and unique experiences, Haney exposes the reader to some of the lesser known people to be captured by the allure of film making, acting and the promise

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BOOK REVIEW: Permanent Midnight by Jerry Stahl

Before self-publishing made it possible for anyone to share their drug battle with the world, and before those brave enough to fight the stigma against addiction and “recover out loud,” there was Permanent Midnight. This memoir by Jerry Stahl was released in 1995 but still reigns as the king of all drug memoirs. The twentieth

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BOOK REVIEW: Sparks – An Adventure in Street Photography by Stephen Leslie

The intersection between literature and photography is a place I like to occupy.  Photos are a catalyst for words, words a catalyst for photos and once converged, the energy within their relationship can be dynamic. Stephen Leslie’s ‘Sparks – An Adventure in Street Photography’ is just that. This startlingly beautiful risk of a book is

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BOOK REVIEW: Music From Big Pink by John Niven

I came to John Niven’s novella with only a vague awareness of his work (plenty of people have recommended reading his best-known work Kill your friends, which I intend to do) and of the main protagonists in the story, The Band (a distant variation of whom – as a ‘greatest hits’ Bob Dylan fan – I saw

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BOOK REVIEW: The Letters Page Vol 3 Edited by Jon McGregor

The Letters Page, Vol 3. edited by Jon McGregor is a celebration of handwritten correspondence. This epistolary journal features letters from established and emerging writers on the theme of departure. Its smart design boasts a fold-out mailing package combined with all the nostalgic features of handwritten letters. There’s a red wax seal on the cover,

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BOOK REVIEW: Paperback Crush by Gabrielle Moss

This is an entertaining journey back in time for many teenage girls reading in the 70’s, 80s & 90s. I liked the concept of the book, it is easy to read or just to flick through, written in a journal style. It has clear chapters with many front covers of the original books. It is

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BOOK REVIEW: The New Silk Roads: The Present And Future Of The World by Peter Frankopan

This is a sequel to The Silk Roads (2015). It researches how past migration effects our world today. The Silk Roads are an ancient concept of how people and trade moved between Asia, Europe and Africa. They are not roads at such, but how cultures, and continents are interwoven and how religion, language and disease

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NON-FICTION: Madness and Massacre; Chinese miners on the Victorian Goldfields by James Aitchison

Gold brings out the worst in humans, and nowhere more so than on the goldfields themselves.  In 1857, far from the prying eyes of the colonial government, European miners slaughtered their Chinese counterparts, destroyed their homes, stores, temple and equipment, and largely escaped justice.  Meanwhile, incarceration in barbaric mental asylums awaited other Chinese miners who

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