Tag: literature writing

If It Bleeds by Stephen King

Reading Stephen King for me is a type of therapy; one that is good for the soul and mind. When I get a new book from him it’s like sliding on a pair of comfy slippers, pouring myself a hot steaming cup of coffee and disappearing for a while into the world and characters he’s

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Neutral Evil ))) by Lee Klein

You know how some books just sell themselves? They have that comfy kind of mass appeal –  a little light and shade, a little wholesome, a character for everyone? Well, how does a work of autofiction with a semi stream-of-consciousness narrative about a doom-drone band, the specifications of guitar amps, edibles, the echo chamber and

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Dead and Breakfast by Gary Buller

What I love about Gary Buller and his work is that you never know what you’re going to get. Each journey into his fabulously crafted stories and deranged mind, bring with it apprehension and dread, that the words you are going to read will taint you in some way, and for me, that is the

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Transference By John Bowie

I have to say that I’m not a huge crime fan, I’ve read my fare share of books in this field but it’s a genre that doesn’t really excite me, that was until I discovered John Bowie’s first book Untethered (review can be read at the bottom of this post) part one of the Black

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The Lost Future of Pepperharrow by Natasha Pulley

Dive into steam-punk Japan with Natasha Pulley’s highly anticipated sequel, The Lost Future of Pepperharrow. Favourite characters return for an exciting, daring adventure, which perfectly blends the worlds of science and mythology. New additions help keep the story fresh, and Pulley’s decision to shift the setting to some lesser-known areas of Japan allows for some

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Tethered by Ross Jeffery

About a year ago, I was at a book launch in Dublin and a card caught my eye as I was leaving. I had my newborn in the pram with me (I figured she wasn’t sleeping anyway, so she might as well come to a book launch). It was coming up to Mother’s Day, and

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The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

A novel which shows the reader the magic of science, The Watchmaker of Filigree Street is captivating, gripping and thoroughly enjoyable. A blend of tones bring this unique story to life, bouncing around time-zones and character point of views to give us a well-rounded narrative. Pulley’s alternative portrayal of Victorian Britain is an added twist

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Green Fingers by Dan Coxon

How does your garden grow? Dan Coxon’s, needless to say, grows supernaturally, with infinite, unruly species. The author’s new mini-collection Green Fingers is a secret garden of horror stories: shadowy, motley, but robustly knotted together by one thematic root. We jump from cabin in the woods to waggon in the snow, stumbling across invasive pot-plants,

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The Treatment by Michael Nath

I first encountered Michael Nath’s work in my final year of university. A friend of mine suggested an impromptu trip to Leicester Literary Festival, and though we were both exhausted from cramming the night before, we summed up the courage to go. At a small stall, tucked away in a corner of the festival building,

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Nothing on Earth by Conor O’Callaghan

It is early evening when a dishevelled and terrified twelve year old girl bangs on the door of a middle aged Irish priest. Her father has disappeared and we immediately find ourselves sharing the narrator’s intense anxiety. Conor O’ Callaghan’s first novel, Nothing on Earth, is a Gothic tale set in a barren half built

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