Tag: literary reviews

Sour Candy by Kealan Patrick Burke

I’ve been going on a journey recently with regards to Kealan Patrick Burke’s books, and boy what a journey it is turning out to be. Steve Stred who had read and advanced copy of my novella Juniper and kindly offered me a quote to use in the publicity of it mentioned that my writing reminded

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Our Alexandro by Timothy Boudreau

The second time Gina Oleson falls for the fiancé scam, Jenny isn’t as understanding.  A fiancé in Greece who needs help financing a business purchase?  A texted image of a check from the Bank of England for three million Euros?  Poor Gina lives in a crap Westfield, New Hampshire apartment with her elderly cousin, doesn’t

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Consider This by Chuck Palahniuk

‘Consider This: Moments In My Writing Life After Which Everything Was Different‘ (which from this moment on will be referred to as Consider This) is not just a book it is an investment. Chuck Palahniuk has produced a fabulous book about writing craft, which as a fan of Palahniuk I’m thrilled with, but as a

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Grand Union by Zadie Smith

I picked up Grand Union in the hope that I would be blown away by the powerhouse that is Zadie Smith, and so I was very excited to learn that this was her first and much awaited short story collection. Zadie Smith is an astonishingly great writer, there is no shadow of doubt in that

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Sunday Best by Hannah Storm

I remember every Monday, the soft scent of soap, bubbles filling the air in your laundry room, clothes hanging from the line that grandpa fixed from one wall to the other, the soft hum of the wireless. When the sun shone, I followed you outside, my feet in your footprints, toes pointed like yours. We

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Dragonslayer by Duncan M. Hamilton

A surprisingly exciting novel, Duncan M. Hamilton’s first instalment of the Dragonslayer trilogy is an enjoyable read, full of strong characters and a fully engaged plot. The reader is immediately sucked into the fantasy environment, in a world that isn’t too far removed from our own. Multiple plot-lines and viewpoints give the novel that added

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Lost Voices by Various

Lost Voices was a real treasure to discover and read. Every story that I read just made me a prisoner and I knew I was suffering from Stockholm Syndrome as I never wanted to leave its pages. From the front-page cover to the last page of this book, I felt at home. The  cover image

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Things We Say In The Dark by Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan has, with Things We Say In The Dark astutely given a voice to the fears, anxieties and troublesome ideas that we so often utter in the silence of the darkness, what we scream into the void when we believe no one is watching or listening (many of these stories focusing on women and their fears).

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Neolithica by Dan Soule

Since the passing of James Herbert and the gradual decline of Shaun Hutson’s power as staples in the British Horror Scene. I’ve been hankering for someone to step into that rather large void; which has been left vacant for some time now, by in my opinion two of the brightest and loudest voices that we’ve

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Some Days Are Better Than Ours by Barbara Byar

I’m always admirative of authors that can bring entire worlds, depict insanely convincing characters and trigger numerous emotions with only a few words, a few strokes of the pen. Barbara Byar is one of those authors. In Some Days Are Better Than Ours, she takes us through the tragic lives of numerous characters – families

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