Tag: literary magazine

Headers and Volleys by Emily Harrison

Headers and Volleys needs three people. One for goal, two to pass the ball back and forth, before flicking it up to spin and shoot. Score a goal? Knock one point off the keeper. Kick it wide? Get between goal posts. Who made the rules? You don’t know, but you’ve followed them since primary school

Continue reading

True Crime by Samantha Kolesnik

‘My body was my mother’s unfortunate toy.’ I came to True Crime not knowing what to expect, all I knew was that it was a debut and that it was recommended by Sadie Hartmann (Mother Horror to many other people) – and that recommendation was all I needed. So I picked up my book and

Continue reading

Matthew Baker

We are delighted to bring you a STORGY exclusive interview with Matthew Baker the author of ‘Why Visit America’ which is being published by Bloomsbury Books. Matthew is a stunning author and this collection is something quite urgent, that speaks to the here and now – and it is our belief that this book will

Continue reading

Why Visit America by Matthew Baker

Every now and then a book comes out that when you read it, your world is changed, whether that is that you’ve just discovered a writer who you now adore, whether it moves you in ways you’ve not been moved before, or that the storytelling is so sublime that the book you believe is destined

Continue reading

How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

It’s hard to go through childhood in your second language. And when your father puts you on the spot by teaching you the wrong way to pronounce the word “knife”, making you the class’s laughing stock, it doesn’t get better. It’s that time when you find out that parents don’t always have all the answers,

Continue reading

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton

It’s 1634 and Samuel Pipps, the world’s greatest detective, is being transported from the Dutch East Indies to Amsterdam, where he is facing trial and execution for a crime he may, or may not, have committed. Travelling with him is his loyal bodyguard, Arent Hayes, who is determined to prove his friend innocent, while also

Continue reading

Here is the Beehive by Sarah Crossan

Taking a closely considered look at grief and guilt, Here is the Beehive is an enchanting and poetic novel that uses form to unravel the relationship between Ana, Connor and Rebecca. Ana, the grieving ‘other woman’ struggles to come to terms with how to mourn someone whose ‘real-life’ she knew very little about, despite their

Continue reading

Below Deck by Sophie Hardcastle

Every once in a while, we come across a novel so impressive and so mesmerising, that we find it offers up our own sense of reflection, or an opportunity for us to consider the stories we ourselves would like to put out into the world. For me, Below Deck was just that. Throughout reading, I

Continue reading

The Human Son by Adrian J Walker

The Earth is healed and humans have been extinct for 500 years. Those two things are connected. In the dying days of human civilisation a scientist created a better species, the Erta. Human-like but with none of their physical and emotional flaws. They are walking problem solvers with one purpose – to fix the Earth.

Continue reading

If It Bleeds by Stephen King

Reading Stephen King for me is a type of therapy; one that is good for the soul and mind. When I get a new book from him it’s like sliding on a pair of comfy slippers, pouring myself a hot steaming cup of coffee and disappearing for a while into the world and characters he’s

Continue reading