Tag: literary fiction

Memorial by Bryan Washington

Lot by Bryan Washington was my book of the year in 2019 and you can read that review here and I have been eagerly awaiting his novel Memorial for some time, staring wide eyed with delight at the announcements as they etched closer to a release date – and then the day was finally here,

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We are all Artists by James Woolf

1. Everyday life Evan Millhauser stood watching as they stepped out of the carriage, imagining they were actors auditioning for the part of ‘Passenger getting off a train’. A woman reading an urgent message on her phone. Two students chatting about a lecture as they stepped onto the platform. A woman, tense, consumed by her

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In Just The Right Light by William R. Soldan

In Just The Right Light is a stunning collection of interconnected short stories from William R. Soldan, these stories link through sense of place, characters or events, the connections are there, they might be loose and you’ll need to pay attention but you can follow the journey of these characters, this town and its inhabitants

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A Swim in a Pond in the Rain by George Saunders

George Saunders, lauded for his short stories and winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize for Lincoln in the Bardo, has been a teacher on the Syracuse University MFA creative writing program since 1997. This book is based on one of his Syracuse courses on Russian literature. A Swim in a Pond includes seven classic

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Starving Ghosts in Every Thread by Eric LaRocca

There is nothing out there quite like this book. LaRocca has exploded onto the scene with his debut novella Starving Ghosts In Every Thread and for me I couldn’t be happier for him and the reading / horror community because there is so much more this guy has to offer and I understand more coming soon

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Lightseekers by Femi Kayode

Here’s an interesting premise for a thriller: three students are brutally attacked and lynched by a mob in the Nigerian university town of Okriki. Everybody knows who did it – the whole thing was captured on social media – but nobody knows why. Dr Philip Taiwo, a psychologist and expert on the behaviour of crowds,

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Afterlives by Abdulrazak Gurnah

Informative and necessary, Abdulrazak Gurnah uses stripped back prose to tell the stories of Hamza, Ilyas and Afiya in his insightful new novel, Afterlives. It’s a satisfying linear tale, and one that doesn’t need any literary embellishments to bring the narrative to life. Gurnah takes us through the lives of his characters in a simple, effective

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Dust & Time by Mitch Sebourn

I first discovered Mitch Sebourn during the Covid pandemic – and I have to say it’s one of the best things that has come out of all that crazy! With being stuck in the house and not a lot to do (when I wasn’t at work) I also decided to set up a YouTube channel

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The BBC National Short Story Award 2020 by Various

What a feast of delights awaits us the reader in this years BBC National Short Story Award 2020 from Comma Press – I’m a huge fan of this series as I’m a huge fan of the short story form and well this year we are treated to some great voices, some old and some new

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This Alone Could Save Us by Santino Prinzi

This Along Could Save Us is a flash fiction collection of 51, yes 51 short pieces of flash. The book is a real quick read and works as a great palate cleanser between larger books, the stories aren’t very deep but are enjoyable with the flow of Prinzi’s prose, but for me, the collection was

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