Tag: literary fiction

A Cynical View of Dystopian America by Benjamin McPherson Ficklin

A post by the account PDX alerts: Report of a nude female masturbating on the Cesar Chavez Blvd I-5 overpass, incident causing slowed traffic in Northbound lanes. Eight minutes later, next post in the same thread: Police responding to multiple calls. Eleven minutes later, next post: Police in foot chase with suspect. Thirty-seven minutes later,

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NASH MAN by Francis Duffy

Pity on passing faces, like I’m dumb for doing what smart guys avoid. Females at first smile on seeing a spiffy young male standing tall alongside the ramp up to a west-bound highway. Short hair parted left and combed flat with white sidewalls. Pale Oxford shirt tucked in, belted dark chinos, thin black necktie, shined

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Best British Short Stories 2019 Edited by Nicholas Royle

Who doesn’t like an anthology? I have a penchant for themed anthologies mostly, as I sometimes find anthologies which collate a load of stories together seem a little disjointed,  choking the flow to other stories, jarring and hampering my enjoyment (ever so slightly may I add). But what we have here in the Best British

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Rolling Out by Meg Pokrass

I woke up, rolled out of bed, and felt beautiful. I called the man I’d met online and told him that I really lived a lot closer than he thought. “I’m wearing elevator shoes,” he said. “Because I’m tall in my soul.” Fine with me. When I looked in the mirror, I just had to

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Deadbook by Debora C. Martin

Marie was stretched out on the sofa, sipping a glass of wine, flicking through the television channels. We’d already watched two shows featuring evil people, smart crime solvers, and autopsies, not speaking much while we watched, dozing off from time to time, but not at the same time. Marie rested the remote on her thigh.

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Let’s Hope for the Best by Carolina Setterwall

In this autofiction novel, Carolina Setterwall takes us on an intense, breath-taking journey through grief, motherhood, and love. This is a gut-wrenching novel which – on more than one occasion – left me close to tears and eager to cement those relationships that I have let drift away. Yet pity or sadness aren’t the only

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Spider by Meg Pokrass

There’s a spider in the bathroom, I tell him. It’s six feet tall, I say. I wake him up and tell him to save me. I pee a few times a night and can’t imagine slipping into the cold bathroom alone, facing this spider head-on. It’s frigid here in Siberia. Outside, nothing can live for

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Lot by Bryan Washington

This book quite literally blew me away, knocked the wind out of my lungs and had me crawling amongst my tattered dreams of wanting to be a writer – because, you see, Bryan Washington is the writer I want to be. Washington delivers a beguiling collection of intimate portraits of the lost and silenced voices

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Moon Expert: A Reverie

The Moon is 2,000 miles across and about a quarter-million miles from Earth. It formed from chunks of rock and ice when the Earth and the rest of our solar system was molded from the Grand Cataclysm responsible for everything, about 4.5 billion years ago, the one that ended one thing and began another. Perhaps

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Table Manners by Susmita Bhattacharya

Table Manners is an insatiably wrought collection of unflinching short stories from a writer who is telling the world how it is, and is unapologetic in her approach. It’s fierce writing, whilst also being poignant, but the overall feeling that I get from Bhattacharya is that she is fearless in her writing, and this is

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