Tag: Independent Publishing

BOOK REVIEW: The Study Circle by Haroun Khan

If you didn’t know The Study Circle was a debut novel before you read it, I guarantee you never would’ve guessed. I certainly didn’t. Haroun Khan’s first novel is raw in subject matter and sophisticated in style. In an essay titled “My Political Novel”, Khan explains how the novel was a written over a two-year period.

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BOOK REVIEW: Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway

Bindlestiff is one of those books that took forever to read, forever in a good way…I just didn’t want it to end. I set about each evening to devour more of this offering from Wayne Holloway only for my mind to shut down after a few pages – it wasn’t through boredom it was that

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BOOK REVIEW: The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas by Daniel James

Who is Ezra Maas? Is he Daniel James the author of this ambitious fiction (or is it non-fiction?)? Is he a real artist? Is it a fake name that a group of artists hide behind? Or did James make him up for this book? These are some of the questions that’ll follow you as you

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BOOK REVIEW: The Cuban Club by Barry Gifford

Pushing back on the perceived notions of 1950’s America – the good old days, the easy life, prosperity and opportunity in a post-war boom USA – Barry Gifford’s The Cuban Club is a coming-of-age collection void of rose-tinted glasses. Here, life occurs, real life – the losses, the love, pain, violence, death, sex, childhood and

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BOOK REVIEW: Shitstorm by Fernando Sdrigotti

Walter Turner – a dentist from Mississippi, has shot a lion. Not just any lion. He’s shot Cyril, a lion beloved by people such as Danny Gervais, Maria Farrow and Shane Osbourne [no points for guessing who they are in our supposed reality.] What follows is, predictably, a shitstorm. A shitstorm so big that Walter’s

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BOOK REVIEW: The Other Lives by Adrian J Walker

Adrian J Walker is back, following up on his wonderful dystopian novel THE LAST DOG ON EARTH with THE OTHER LIVES. This one is harder to place in a genre but no less entertaining and thought provoking. I’d summarise it as a metaphysical meditation on the current woes of British society wrapped up in a

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BOOK REVIEW: Mayhem & Death by Helen McClory

The quality of the writing here announces itself from the start: Frances had waited…for the static to disperse from her daughter’s personality; the obscuring details of herself that got between her and other people and then, shortly after, a storm cloud poured into the shape of a girl. These are the kind of short stories

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