Tag: independent publishers

The Almost Mothers by Laura Besley

It’s hard to be a mother. You don’t really study for it. You can’t tell people: I have BA in mothering with honours. That might be why some mothers feel so inadequate. Or why some others feel the need to get validation from others. Or why some fall apart. No book or NCT course will

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Saving Lucia by Anna Vaught

The motif of the Bird flies all the way through Anna Vaught’s novel, Saving Lucia. It encapsulates in its image a plethora of contradictory notions: freedom and constraint, strength and vulnerability, companionship and loneliness, elation and desolation. The birds that flit in and out of this novel offer both solace and sorrow to the characters

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The Many Mothers of a Story by Rym Kechacha

In the summer of 2016, I moved to Putney in south-west London and got a new job that meant I could cycle to work. Some days on my two-wheeled commute I would get to the river at Putney Bridge and turn left to pedal upriver along the Thames river path. I would pass long hedges

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Always North by Vicki Jarrett

Always North by Vicki Jarrett is a strange little beast, on the one hand I thought that the location and isolation that she brought to the book were astonishingly well written – you could feel the bleakness of it, the coldness of the arctic and at times when I was reading in bed, I’m sure

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Photographs of Madness: Inside Out by Alec Ivan Fulgate

When I was 14, I had this massive crush on my friend Ana from my art class. She was a couple of years older, and as effortlessly cool as I was effortlessly awkward. She lived this bohemian life in a hippieish Parisian flat with her mum and brother (who I also had a massive crush

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Million Eyes: Extra Time by C.R. Berry

Wow, what a ride! That is the first thing I think of after reading Million Eyes: Extra Time by C.R.Berry. This compilation of short stories is set in the universe of Time Travel where conspiracies are explained through the lens of time travelers changing time to suit their purpose. It is part of a trilogy whose

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Please Read This Leaflet Carefully by Karen Havelin

‘Please Read this Leaflet Carefully’ is a life told in reverse. We begin in the present moment [2016] of Laura, our protagonist’s life – New York City, mid-thirties, a single mother and a body wracked with pain having been diagnosed with endometriosis in her twenties. From there we are taken backwards, travelling through Laura’s life

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Subjunctive Moods by CG Menon

A short story collection that captivates from the very start, Subjunctive Moods is a spectacular triumph and brilliant example of how setting can really bring a story to life. Menon is no stranger to multi-cultural experiences, and this shines through in her short prose. Each story is crafted to the utmost quality, and we feel

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Best British Short Stories 2019 Edited by Nicholas Royle

Who doesn’t like an anthology? I have a penchant for themed anthologies mostly, as I sometimes find anthologies which collate a load of stories together seem a little disjointed,  choking the flow to other stories, jarring and hampering my enjoyment (ever so slightly may I add). But what we have here in the Best British

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Table Manners by Susmita Bhattacharya

Table Manners is an insatiably wrought collection of unflinching short stories from a writer who is telling the world how it is, and is unapologetic in her approach. It’s fierce writing, whilst also being poignant, but the overall feeling that I get from Bhattacharya is that she is fearless in her writing, and this is

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