Tag: fiction writer

Sour Candy by Kealan Patrick Burke

I’ve been going on a journey recently with regards to Kealan Patrick Burke’s books, and boy what a journey it is turning out to be. Steve Stred who had read and advanced copy of my novella Juniper and kindly offered me a quote to use in the publicity of it mentioned that my writing reminded

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Our Alexandro by Timothy Boudreau

The second time Gina Oleson falls for the fiancé scam, Jenny isn’t as understanding.  A fiancé in Greece who needs help financing a business purchase?  A texted image of a check from the Bank of England for three million Euros?  Poor Gina lives in a crap Westfield, New Hampshire apartment with her elderly cousin, doesn’t

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Lynette by Sterling Warner

An exceptional woman, Lynette managed to convince everyone that “better judgment” was a concept predicated in nonsense. She knew how to have fun. That’s her—over there with the tie-dye shawl, kicking it up at the beach with her typical aplomb. She’d be the first to remove her bra, climb on a stranger’s shoulders “piggy-back,” and

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Consider This by Chuck Palahniuk

‘Consider This: Moments In My Writing Life After Which Everything Was Different‘ (which from this moment on will be referred to as Consider This) is not just a book it is an investment. Chuck Palahniuk has produced a fabulous book about writing craft, which as a fan of Palahniuk I’m thrilled with, but as a

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Grand Union by Zadie Smith

I picked up Grand Union in the hope that I would be blown away by the powerhouse that is Zadie Smith, and so I was very excited to learn that this was her first and much awaited short story collection. Zadie Smith is an astonishingly great writer, there is no shadow of doubt in that

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Flare and Falter by Michael Conley

Flare and Falter is a humorous and light-hearted short story collection, occasionally bordering on the absurd. Conley gives us a delightful glimpse into the inner workings of his creative talents, creating bizarre worlds, plot lines that move in every which way, and relatable characters, in these short pieces that leave us questioning our own society.

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Dragonslayer by Duncan M. Hamilton

A surprisingly exciting novel, Duncan M. Hamilton’s first instalment of the Dragonslayer trilogy is an enjoyable read, full of strong characters and a fully engaged plot. The reader is immediately sucked into the fantasy environment, in a world that isn’t too far removed from our own. Multiple plot-lines and viewpoints give the novel that added

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Photographs of Madness: Inside Out by Alec Ivan Fulgate

When I was 14, I had this massive crush on my friend Ana from my art class. She was a couple of years older, and as effortlessly cool as I was effortlessly awkward. She lived this bohemian life in a hippieish Parisian flat with her mum and brother (who I also had a massive crush

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Lost Voices by Various

Lost Voices was a real treasure to discover and read. Every story that I read just made me a prisoner and I knew I was suffering from Stockholm Syndrome as I never wanted to leave its pages. From the front-page cover to the last page of this book, I felt at home. The  cover image

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Things We Say In The Dark by Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan has, with Things We Say In The Dark astutely given a voice to the fears, anxieties and troublesome ideas that we so often utter in the silence of the darkness, what we scream into the void when we believe no one is watching or listening (many of these stories focusing on women and their fears).

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