Tag: faber & faber

BOOK REVIEW: Come Rain or Come Shine by Kazuno Ishiguro

An accomplished writer, of that there is no doubt, Kazuo Ishiguro’s short story ‘Come Rain or Come Shine’ is a piece that speaks differently than his other work. It’s not the dystopian fiction of ‘Never Let Me Go’ nor is it quite like his 1989 novel ‘The Remains of the Day’. Here he branches into

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BOOK REVIEW: Mary Ventura And The Ninth Kingdom by Sylvia Plath

How brilliant it is to get to review a book about a train journey, whilst on the train journey. Though I do hope my journey’s ending isn’t as unsettling as the one in Mary Ventura and the 9th Kingdom.  As I type, I notice with mounting horror that the person next to me is repeatedly

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BOOK REVIEW: Dante and the Lobster by Samuel Beckett

I just read Dante and the Lobster over coffee and an unnecessarily large amount of mini flapjacks. Now that I’m nicely buzzed on caffeine and sugar I won’t hold off telling you how brilliant it is. I might even insist that you read it, READ IT NOW. It is delightful. Lighthearted in its tone, and

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BOOK REVIEW: Mr Salary by Sally Rooney

So, this year Faber are turning ninety years old and don’t they look good for it! To celebrate their ninetieth year Faber are releasing a landmark series of individual volumes in stunning paperbacks, showcasing some of the masters of the short story form within a range of varying styles and genres. So, dust off your

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BEST BOOKS: Emily Harrison’s Best Books Read in 2018

We asked Emily Harrison one of our STORGY Reviewers what her best books of 2018 were and below are her findings… 2018 has been a year full of words – I’ve started [finally] writing and submitting my work, but I’ve also started reading more [which is odd considering I did an English degree for three

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BOOK REVIEW: Madame Zero by Sarah Hall

Sarah Hall knows how to unsettle. She knows how to write the eerie and construct the magnetic – prose that pulls you and begs to be read. She knows too, how to disturb, and of the nine stories in Madame Zero, perhaps disturb is the best way to describe them. Each have elements of the

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BOOK REVIEW: Infidelities by Kirsty Gunn

From the metafictional introduction, we know from the start that we are in the hands of an assured writer, one who has completed their apprenticeship and is now in the process of completing the books she will be known for. That this book won the Edge Hill prize is no guarantee of quality, but it’s

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BOOK REVIEW: Sex & Death

Sex and death: two timeless and oft-coupled themes that can be traced back even to the earliest Sumerian literature. Think of the epic tale of Gilgamesh, his quest for eternal life, the death of his best friend, his irrepressible sexual desire which of course leads to a downfall. Sex and death: powerful imperatives of our

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BOOK REVIEW: Rotten Row by Petina Gappah

The purpose of a book review is to give you an opinion, dear reader, as to whether the book at hand is worth splurging your well sponged money on. The short answer for those busy readers is yes. Whether that is a ‘definitely yes’ or a ‘maybe yes’ depends on, well, you and what you

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BOOK REVIEW: Grief Is The Thing With Feathers by Max Porter

On occasion you come across a book that is so mesmeric, so delicate, intricate and beautiful that awe is the only appropriate response. Grief is the thing with feathers by (shockingly) debut author Max Porter is just such a book. Describing the novel is difficult. For a start, the term novel fails to adequately describe

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