Tag: booklover

Neutral Evil ))) by Lee Klein

You know how some books just sell themselves? They have that comfy kind of mass appeal –  a little light and shade, a little wholesome, a character for everyone? Well, how does a work of autofiction with a semi stream-of-consciousness narrative about a doom-drone band, the specifications of guitar amps, edibles, the echo chamber and

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Diary of a Murderer by Kim Young-ha

Delving into Diary of a Murderer, one is filled with a curious sense of unease. Despite holding short stories of definite direction and plots, one wanders around inside them as if in a David Lynch movie. We have characters, progressions and plot twists, but they somehow the tone of these stories supersedes their storylines. There

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Bone China Laura Purcell

Hester Why is running from her past. Louise Pinecroft is waiting for resolution. But in Morvoren House, no one gets what they want. Bone China is the latest novel from Laura Purcell – a modern queen of gothic fiction. Fans of her sinister story-telling in The Silent Companions will be delighted with this new tale,

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Little Feasts by Jules Archer

Jules Archer is the author of the chapbook All the Ghosts We’ve Always Had, published by Thirty West and regularly publishes flash fiction in a variety of magazines. This tiny collection of nineteen flash fictions features a ‘menu’ instead of a contents list and is focussed on tales of hunger, appetites and cravings. Many of

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Eden by Tim Lebbon

Part of the job here at STORGY is that I have to read a tonne of books, everything from short story collections, to anthologies, to independently published fiction, to the great novels from the larger publishers – poetry sometimes, experimental the next… I read everything and everything. Eden is one of those books that wraps

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The Fabric of Tombstones by B F Jones

About two thirds of the way through ‘The Fabric of Tombstones’ there’s a line – short and sweet though it is – that perhaps sums up what we should expect from B.F Jones’ debut flash fiction collection. ‘All these souls, here momentarily, before going there permanently, trying to get on with their lives and make

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Laura Cassidy’s Walk of Fame by Alan McMonagle

A daringly bold and funny novel, Laura Cassidy’s Walk of Fame is a colourful portrayal of grief, mental illness, and dysfunctional families. Laura plays her part of the “leading lady” wonderfully, a hugely likeable and muddled character, who has ambitious dreams. McMonagle encourages us to see past her – and the other characters’ – mental

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Lady of Shadows by Breanna Teintze

The next adventure for Corcoran Gray and Brix awaits.  After Corcoran was consumed by an old wizard’s body – supposedly Lord Jaern in the first novel, here they are again. Now the pair go to visit an acquaintance, Jaliseth after Gray needs some Wardstones, to silence his nightmares when he sleeps and to stop his

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The Treatment by Michael Nath

I first encountered Michael Nath’s work in my final year of university. A friend of mine suggested an impromptu trip to Leicester Literary Festival, and though we were both exhausted from cramming the night before, we summed up the courage to go. At a small stall, tucked away in a corner of the festival building,

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A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende

A rich and compelling novel, A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende is an ambitious and outstanding feat of literature, spanning multiple families, generations, and continents, taking the reader on a journey through key moments of recent history. Despite being set against the chaotic backdrop of work, the book is far from bleak.

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