Tag: book blogging

True Crime by Samantha Kolesnik

‘My body was my mother’s unfortunate toy.’ I came to True Crime not knowing what to expect, all I knew was that it was a debut and that it was recommended by Sadie Hartmann (Mother Horror to many other people) – and that recommendation was all I needed. So I picked up my book and

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Hope Island by Tim Major

Nina Scafe, a workaholic TV producer from the North of England, takes her teenage daughter Laurie to visit her grandparents on Hope Island, off the coast of Maine in the USA. She’s hoping to find the right moment to break it Laurie that her father has left them for his secret second family. Tensions run

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Matthew Baker

We are delighted to bring you a STORGY exclusive interview with Matthew Baker the author of ‘Why Visit America’ which is being published by Bloomsbury Books. Matthew is a stunning author and this collection is something quite urgent, that speaks to the here and now – and it is our belief that this book will

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Why Visit America by Matthew Baker

Every now and then a book comes out that when you read it, your world is changed, whether that is that you’ve just discovered a writer who you now adore, whether it moves you in ways you’ve not been moved before, or that the storytelling is so sublime that the book you believe is destined

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An Inheritance by Diane Simmons

Seventy years is a long time right? It’s in fact a lifetime, but what we have with An Inheritance is a gripping novella-in-flash that takes us on this journey at breakneck speed, as we flit through seventy years and four generations of family life – with all its love, grittiness, despair, hope, loss, grief and

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The Final Weekend: A Stoned Tale by Neal Cassidy

Professor Goodkat is an arrogant Jack the lad – who is actually 41 years of age. He has achieved everything in his work, he likes casual sex and is a pothead but in reality enjoys routine and a mundane life. Then he meets Trent, an ex-student, who is barely holding down a job in a

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How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

It’s hard to go through childhood in your second language. And when your father puts you on the spot by teaching you the wrong way to pronounce the word “knife”, making you the class’s laughing stock, it doesn’t get better. It’s that time when you find out that parents don’t always have all the answers,

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Here is the Beehive by Sarah Crossan

Taking a closely considered look at grief and guilt, Here is the Beehive is an enchanting and poetic novel that uses form to unravel the relationship between Ana, Connor and Rebecca. Ana, the grieving ‘other woman’ struggles to come to terms with how to mourn someone whose ‘real-life’ she knew very little about, despite their

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Below Deck by Sophie Hardcastle

Every once in a while, we come across a novel so impressive and so mesmerising, that we find it offers up our own sense of reflection, or an opportunity for us to consider the stories we ourselves would like to put out into the world. For me, Below Deck was just that. Throughout reading, I

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The Human Son by Adrian J Walker

The Earth is healed and humans have been extinct for 500 years. Those two things are connected. In the dying days of human civilisation a scientist created a better species, the Erta. Human-like but with none of their physical and emotional flaws. They are walking problem solvers with one purpose – to fix the Earth.

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