Tag: book blogger

Things We Say In The Dark by Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan has, with Things We Say In The Dark astutely given a voice to the fears, anxieties and troublesome ideas that we so often utter in the silence of the darkness, what we scream into the void when we believe no one is watching or listening (many of these stories focusing on women and their fears).

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Tender Cuts by Jayne Martin

Jayne Martin’s collection of micro fiction, published by Vine Leaves Press, is billed as ‘tiny tales for the time challenged.’ It features thirty-eight stories, none of them longer than 300 words, some of them much shorter. Martin began her writing career as a TV screenwriter. She’s been publishing flash fiction for about ten years and

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Some Days Are Better Than Ours by Barbara Byar

I’m always admirative of authors that can bring entire worlds, depict insanely convincing characters and trigger numerous emotions with only a few words, a few strokes of the pen. Barbara Byar is one of those authors. In Some Days Are Better Than Ours, she takes us through the tragic lives of numerous characters – families

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The Stranger by Steve Stred

Steve Stred with his novel The Stranger offers us a detailed meditation in horror. Stred has been able to siphon off the tropes of various horror sources such as films, books and real life horrors – of what makes monsters of men; and blended them to perfection with his offering of The Stranger. The Stranger

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Wonderland: An Anthology edited by Paul Kane & Marie O’Regan

This book has a wide selection of authors all writing fabulous short stories from the source material of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. Many of these writers are the go to scribes for anthologies recently and they don’t disappoint providing the reader with a wide array of fantasy, horror and dark brooding fiction. I found

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Mistletoe by Alison Littlewood

Do you believe in ghosts? Leah didn’t, she was recovering from a catastrophic event in her life, so moved herself away to a new area and a rundown empty house, to escape her grief, but as these things tend to do, it followed her to the house she was supposed to have had with her

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Alice In Wonderland by Lewis Carroll illustrated by Charles van Sandwyk – Folio Society Edition

Lewis Carroll’s extraordinary vivid dream world of Alice In Wonderland is as old as the day is long – it’s a story that has been told over and over again, and honestly it never loses its appeal. As a child I don’t remember when I first discovered it, it seemed to have always been there,

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Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe by Heather Webber

A light-hearted and dreamy novel, Midnight at the Blackbird Café soothes the reader with its gentle imagery and hints of magical realism. A book which remains at surface-level, the writer entices the reader through her likable characters and small-town sweetness. The environment and famous café are full of dainty delights, however it does little to

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Sarah Jane by James Sallis

‘All stories are ghost stories, about things lost, people, memories, home, passion, youth, about things struggling to be seen, to be accepted by the living.’ I’m not going to apologise for being a little quote heavy in this review of Sarah Jane by James Sallis, such is the beauty of the prose on every page.

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Skein Island by Aliya Whiteley

Skein Island is a fricking masterpiece. Right now I’ve got that out of the way we can continue; so, Skein Island is the next novel from Aliya Whiteley, and it’s an old novel, which has been repurposed and republished by Titan Books and I for one am so very thankful that this has happened – I had

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