Tag: bloomsbury books

I Know What I Saw by Imran Mahmood

Pushing the boundaries of the traditional whodunnit tale, I Know What I Saw by Imran Mahmood is a remarkable story of grief and memory. “When I remember my life before, I am really reimagining it, in flashes, in tiny abstract glimpses. And in that memory,  I compose my own rhythm close enough to match the

Continue reading

Bright Burning Things by Lisa Harding

Bright Burning Things is a quietly beautiful novel that delicately handles the pressures of addiction illness. Sonya, a complex and kind character, pursues a path of recovery when her role as a mother to Tommy is questioned. What follows is an intense and considered portrayal of family life, highlighting strained relationships and darkened pasts. We

Continue reading

No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood

Poetic, gripping, and unarguably unique, No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood is a novel on social media that we didn’t know we needed. Lockwood has taken a now well-worn, over-analysed aspect of modern society, and injected it with an impressive poignancy. What follows is a novel that crosses genres, stomping unapologetically through

Continue reading

Male Tears by Benjamin Myers

I am a huge fan of Myers’ work having read many of not all of his published works and I was delighted to hear that he was releasing a short story collection with Bloomsbury Books and when I could I requested that book. Ben Myers is one of my favourite British writers, his work on

Continue reading

The End of the World is a Cul De Sac by Louise Kennedy

The End of the World is a Cul De Sac by Louise Kennedy is a varied short story collection, there is a remarkable gift here and there is no denying that there are flourishes of brilliance in her prose and the structure of the stories; but it’s a collection that I didn’t really get on

Continue reading

The Last Good Man by Thomas McMullan

Set in the barren hills of the countryside, this sinister dystopian novel is a compelling read that explores the power of words. When everyday life has been thrown to the wind and an existence rooted in violence and survival takes over, The Last Good Man is a gritty look at what happens when a community

Continue reading

A Swim in a Pond in the Rain by George Saunders

George Saunders, lauded for his short stories and winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize for Lincoln in the Bardo, has been a teacher on the Syracuse University MFA creative writing program since 1997. This book is based on one of his Syracuse courses on Russian literature. A Swim in a Pond includes seven classic

Continue reading

Lightseekers by Femi Kayode

Here’s an interesting premise for a thriller: three students are brutally attacked and lynched by a mob in the Nigerian university town of Okriki. Everybody knows who did it – the whole thing was captured on social media – but nobody knows why. Dr Philip Taiwo, a psychologist and expert on the behaviour of crowds,

Continue reading

Afterlives by Abdulrazak Gurnah

Informative and necessary, Abdulrazak Gurnah uses stripped back prose to tell the stories of Hamza, Ilyas and Afiya in his insightful new novel, Afterlives. It’s a satisfying linear tale, and one that doesn’t need any literary embellishments to bring the narrative to life. Gurnah takes us through the lives of his characters in a simple, effective

Continue reading

INTERVIEW: Tim Binding author of Beneath the Trees of Eden

An English Western inspired by William Faulkner, Beneath the Trees of Eden is Tim Binding’s masterpiece: a visionary depiction of England at the twilight of a rebellious era, told through the story of a renegade couple as they travel across the country’s motorways. S. How did you carry out the practical research for the novel, particularly in

Continue reading