Category: Literature

The Disposable Years By Leslie McIntyre

Nicholas is already crying by the time I reach the cafeteria. No histrionics today, no wailing, no attention-seeking behavior; he’s just huddled by himself at the far end of an unoccupied table with his knees drawn up to his chest, tears dribbling out of his eyes and running down his cheeks, nose running a little,

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The Bowl By Miki Lentin

Rob had five rules for a decent Saturday night out at south Dublin’s Dundrum Bowl, the scene of many tragedies. Win at pool, get digits, snog and get served. And importantly, you had to stay on his wavelength. These evenings were unpredictable, but they were an escape from drinking sherry from the bottle, while sitting

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Mint Condition By Tyler Koke

A paper cup spins slowly in the break room microwave. Maurice watches. The caffeine can’t come soon enough. His head hurts and his vision is blurry at the edges. Insomnia. The microwave dings and Maurice grabs his coffee. He takes his first sip and Sherrie trudges into the break room. “Morning,” she says.  “How’s Jenny?

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The Broken Heart By David Micklem

I don’t remember who first suggested it. I’d done some modelling when I finished school but that dried up pretty quickly. It was a Spanish brand and I never got to see the pictures, how I looked. Made a bit of cash, bought myself some wheels. Got a bit too big for my boots, Gary

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Frogs in a Pot By Meagan Lucas

“I need your eyes,” Ben said, scanning the road through the windshield. “You’re supposed to be the navigator and you’re not paying attention.” And then, under his breath, “like usual.” In fairness, she wasn’t. Amanda was watching a huge group of blackbirds alight from an electrical line, together, a living swirl of beaks and feathers,

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Syndicate By Conor O’Sullivan

The warm evening air clung to Charlotte’s arms when she exited Waterloo and set off towards Brad Street. Clear skies, spread like a quilt over the city, suggested a long twilight. People told anecdotes in that shrill tone that comes after a few drinks as she walked by the crowded bars. ‘He keeps liking my

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Daylight Savings Time, Part III By David Lohrey

P.K.’s assistant, the guy famous in the office for banging secretaries against the wall of the powder room in the office’s main corridor, a guy named Nate Binswanger, told me to get over it. What exactly “it” meant to him, I wouldn’t know, but it pertained to my sulky attitude, he said, following the death

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Christmas is A Sad Season For Everyone By Sean Nishi

I always find Kendra by the corgi pen in the courtyard at lunch. We have two hundred square feet of mulch and rubber for the pups to run around down there. The corgis were donated by a local animal shelter after they went belly-up during citywide budget cuts. In December our phones went off the

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Billy No Mates By Manuela Saragosa

Billy came with the villa, like the beds, chairs and dining table. The landlady – a soft-spoken Indonesian we called Ibu – said he was part of the rental agreement and mentioned by-the-by that his particular breed of parrot could be taught to speak if properly socialised. But my parents had other things on their

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The Story of the Son Must Be The Story of the Father By Simon Lowe

Despite having not seen him in two years, Adam knows his father’s hair and beard will have recently been dyed white, and he will appear professorial wearing wire framed glasses and a sleeveless woolen cardigan. You see, Michael Douglas has re-entered the Marvel Universe in Ant Man and the Wasp, as Hank Pym, and Adam’s

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