Category: book reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Untethered by John Bowie

Is there a crime at all or an elaborate plot for John Barrie to fall into? John Bowie is a writer for Bristol Noir Publishing and his crime novel does not disappoint, its 186 pages are packed full of deceit, human depravity and surprisingly dark humour. John Barrie has been given a new identity under the

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BOOK REVIEW: Sight by Jessie Greengrass

When I heard that Jessie Greengrass had been given the licence to write a novel, I was for want of a better word ecstatic. Greengrass had given life to a wonderful collection of short stories ‘An Account of the Decline of the Great Auk, According to One Who Saw It’ which I had the joy

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BOOK REVIEW: Tales from The Shadow Booth Vol 1 edited by Dan Coxon

There is a dusty old booth at the end of a pier, it is covered in a faded striped canvas, a handwritten sign hangs next to the opening with the words: “Enter the Shadow Booth for you will never be the same again.” Once you enter this mix between an anthology and journal you truly

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BOOK REVIEW: Conradology

I was named after Joseph Conrad, as he was one of my father’s favourite authors. As such, I’ve always had a soft spot for him. But even bearing this personal affection in mind, there continues to be something remarkably fresh about Conrad. This is not just due to his subject matter, although novels such as

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BOOK REVIEW: The Reservoir Tapes by Jon McGregor

One of the ways I can describe ‘The Reservoir Tapes’ is like a dessert after a huge feast – that feast being ‘Reservoir 13’. Everyone has a separate stomach when it comes to desserts, especially after a mammoth feast; but if you are one of the lucky ones thinking “I can take them or leave

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BOOK REVIEW: 100 Best Games (That Never Existed)

Once, a long time ago, a writer known as Nate Crowley foolishly decided to tweet a fake video-game premise for every Twitter-like he received. A thousand likes later (and with thousands of pounds donated to a charity to preserve frog habitats), he found himself with a book deal and a mission to cull the best

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BOOK REVIEW: Home by Amanda Berriman

The imprint of Penguin, ‘Doubleday’ is publishing yet another gem, now from the debut author Amanda Berriman. Her first novel is the innocently dark novel ‘Home’ and is one that cannot remain unread and is due to be released on the 8th February 2018. Berriman is a primary school teacher who has used her understanding

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BOOK REVIEW: Spare and Found Parts by Sarah Maria Griffin

Sarah Maria Griffin opens up ‘Spare and Found Parts’ with three rules: 1.) The sick in the Pale, the healed in the Pasture. 2.) Contribute, at all cost. 3.) All code is blasphemy. With these three rules Griffin has set up all the parts needed for a great Frankenstein/coming of age story. Take this blend,

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BOOK REVIEW: The Adulterants by Joe Dunthorne

Adulterant – Noun – Plural Noun: adulterants – a substance used to adulterate another. Adulterate – render (something) poorer in quality by adding another substance. From the Latin adulterant (corrupting). What Joe Dunthorne has achieve with ‘The Adulterants’ is something quite special, something that many writers could learn a thing or two from; that, my

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BOOK REVIEW: Travelling in a Strange Land by David Park

‘The world is shrouded in snow. Transport has ground to a halt. Tom must venture out into a transformed and treacherous landscape to collect his son, sick and stranded in student lodgings. But on this solitary trip from Belfast to Sunderland, Tom will be drawn into another journey, one without map or guide, where he

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