Category: book reviews

BOOK REVIEW: Doing It by Hannah Witton

Have you ever wondered why sex is such a taboo? Youtuber Hannah Witton has. Her new book, Doing It, is a bold rejection of the secrecy surrounding sex and similar topics. Not shy of discussing sexting, masturbation, porn, or even her own messy breakups, Hannah offers answers to questions we’ve all thought about but perhaps

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BOOK REVIEW: RISINGTIDEFALLINGSTAR by Philip Hoare

I knew this was a book for which I would struggle to wait for the paperback edition to emerge; ever since its cryptic title started doing the rounds on Twitter I found myself sizing up the relative expenses I had to cover that week and arguing with myself over whether I really wanted a hardback

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BOOK REVIEW: The Things We Thought We Knew by Mahsuda Snaith

The things we thought we knew is the debut novel by Bristol Short Story Prize 2014 winner Mahsuda Snaith. It is the story of eighteen year old Ravine, trapped in bed by chronic pain syndrome. She spends her time replaying in her head the events that led to the disappearance of her childhood best friend

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BOOK REVIEW: Hagseed by Margaret Atwood

A play within a play. Hamlet, right? Yep, but Hagseed too. Commissioned as part of a Vintage’s Hogarth Shakespeare series. Vintage got seven established authors to turn their hand at reimagining the bard’s work. And not in that story archetype way, where every RomCom seems to be a retelling of either Much ado or Taming

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BOOK REVIEW: Virgin and Other Stories by April Ayers Lawson

It’s hard to be a good short story writer, let alone get these stories published. Seldom are publishers interested in a format that doesn’t get carried off to the beach on holiday or translate well onto the pages of the review section of the paper. The publishing world has its eyes firmly on the prize:

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BOOK REVIEW: Phone by Will Self

Phone. Is this a noun or a verb? Is it labelling what has become a common household object, a daily tool so enmeshed in our lives that we no longer notice its presence? Or is it, rather, giving an imperative? Phone him. Phone her. In the answer to this question may lie much of the

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BOOK REVIEW: The Dinner Party by Joshua Ferris

‘The Dinner Party’ is the first short story collection from accomplished writer and Man-Booker shortlisted author Joshua Ferris. A book that has a raw spicy freshness to it, like Sushi and Wasabi. Ferris’ voice is clear and distinctive offering a menu of wonderfully constructed and beautifully written delights. These stories are constructed with great care

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BOOK REVIEW: The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Form the award winning author Kiran Millwood Hargrave of ‘The Girl of Ink & Stars’ comes her much anticipated follow up novel ‘The Island at the End of Everything’ and what a book it is. A kaleidoscopic depiction of a young girls struggles on the Island of Culion in 1906. An island that is both

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BOOK REVIEW: Addlands by Tom Bullough

It took me two attempts to grasp Addlands, Tom Bullough’s fourth novel. In many ways that’s surprising because the book it most resembles is one of my favourites, On the black hill by Bruce Chatwin. Like Chatwin’s novel Addlands is set in a welsh farming community and concerned with how an insular life can provide

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BOOK REVIEW: Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

One kiss can change everything. Ann Patchett’s seventh novel, Commonwealth, begins in 1964, when Albert Cousins locks lips with Beverly Keating at her daughter’s christening party. Both Cousins and Keating are married to another, and the book explores how their kiss binds the two families. The novel tells parallel stories:  at once the narrative of

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